How grandmothers help fight depression in Zimbabwe

A group of grandmothers are using what they call ‘friendship benches’ to help thousands of people suffering from mental health problems in the country

Zimbabwe’s public health system, like other sectors, has been hit by a financial crisis.

With a population of around 16 million, doctors say there are only 12 public health psychiatrists in the whole country.

Now, a group of grandmothers are using what they call “friendship benches” to help thousands of people suffering from mental health problems in the country.

Al Jazeera’s Haru Mutasa reports from Harare.

 

 

 

Source: How grandmothers help fight depression in Zimbabwe | Zimbabwe News | Al Jazeera

Obedience Does Not Mean Submission to Violent Power


Redeeming Good Friday for Survivors

Every Good Friday, Central Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas, holds a worship service dedicated to the seven last words of Christ. Taking readings from each Gospel, worshippers meditate on Jesus’ forgiveness of his murderers, his pardon of criminals, his final instructions to his disciples, his doubt, his thirst, his acceptance, and finally, his submission to God as he dies.

It is his last utterance — “Father, into your hands, I commit my spirit” — that shapes much of our theology of sacrifice, and our Christian call to obedience as faithful submission to God. But as a young Texas seminary student newly grappling with my history of childhood sexual violence, those were not the Good Friday words from Christ that my shattered heart ached to hear. [ . . . ] Read Full Story at Sojourners